• Today is: Friday, August 14, 2020

10 things to do with kids this week in Pittsburgh, from a ‘Jurassic Park’ Watch Party to Pop Art Pop Ups

Sally Quinn
July29/ 2020

Seeking a well-balanced life for your family? We’ve got you covered here. Physical activity, like a new kid’s gym, tennis classes and an all-ages dance session, will get the blood pumping. Creative juices will flow with events like the Pop Art Pop Up and the lowdown on doodling. Learn about local history from new Experience Kits and delve into the fun side of science with a cool “Jurassic Park” Watch Party. And as a reminder that summer’s not over yet, the AIU brings free virtual summer camps to the season programming.

Here are our picks for the best things to do with kids this week in Pittsburgh.

1. Get ready to Romp n’ Roll (in person)

The first Pittsburgh Romp n’ Roll location opens in Larimer on Aug. 3. The kid’s gym for ages 3 months to 5 years brings athletic gym sessions, music and art classes, plus special events. Play-based learning and sensory fun spark imagination. Upcoming classes include Art Explorers, Tumble Tunes and Babies Gym and Music. Safety protocols are in place with precautions like temperature checks, sanitation and limited class size.

2. Register for a free (virtual) summer camp

Organized through Allegheny Intermediate Unit, eight summer programs offer select virtual summer camps to finish out the month of August. Kids from Kindergarten through high school can take advantage of these cool activities. End-of-Summer Virtual Camps range from a Backyard Safari and Podcasting 101 to Modern & Creative Dance. Space is limited, so don’t put off registration which is free.

3. Hop to an in-person Pop Art Pop Up

Head to the Andy Warhol Museum on weekends throughout August for the Pop Art Pop Ups. Look for the big tent across East General Robinson Street where art-making, activities, demonstrations and giveaways are planned from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday of the month. Masks are required and social distancing rules apply. Admission is free.

4. Take (virtual) ‘The Road to Forever’

Children’s theater moves to the virtual stage with Mariposa Theatre’s Pittsburgh premiere of “The Road to Forever.” Actors from across the country team to present this play. The story of courage and friendship is about a girl who travels to the land of Forever to rescue her friend. Enjoy the streaming play live on Friday, July 13, or catch it on YouTube at various times through Aug. 9. Tickets are $9.

5. Experience the (in-person) Experience Kits

Allegheny County Library Association is offering a terrific new program that connects museums and historical sites to families. Experience Kits can be reserved through your local library for pickup on specific weeks. The kits offer a museum pass for four people, brochures, activities and other info to make the most of your visit. Choose from locations like the Heinz History Center, Pennsylvania Trolley Museum and Old Economy Village. Just go to your online library catalog and search for “experience kits.” The many destinations are a terrific way to tour around the region and learn a little history along the way!

6. Dance and Be Fit (in person)

Gather the family and head to the tent in Schenley Plaza for Dance and Be Fit with Roland Ford. The all-ages dance party is set for 7-8 p.m. Friday, July 31. No rhythm? No problem! This session is designed for all abilities to enjoy. Moving and grooving to the music is the perfect way to reduce stress and boost your immune system. Register in advance for the free event. Plan to follow these protocols to stay safe.

7. Learn to play the blues (virtually)

This 5-week virtual course from the Center for Young Musicians is open to guitar and piano students of all ages. Kids will learn to play chord progressions and use them to improvise in several keys. Expect discussions on the history of blues music and its relationship to the evolution of popular music. The Learn to Play the Blues course begins Friday, July 31, and runs every Friday through Aug. 28 from 2-3:30 p.m. Click here to register and click through the summer camps. The course cost is $115.

8. Up your doodle game (virtually)

Kids can learn the difference between scribbling and doodling with this Creativebug online activity. The Creative Doodle: Get Your Doodle On class offers the basics of this more meditative, calming approach. All you need are paper, pens and markers to add color. The Creativebug collection of craft classes is free to all Carnegie Library cardholders.

9. Join the (virtual) ‘Jurassic Park’ Watch Party

It’s so much fun to get together with family to watch a favorite movie, laughing together, jumping and screaming at the surprise twists and throwing back popcorn. This “Jurassic Park” Watch Party cranks the excitement up a notch with scientific commentary from the dinosaur, amphibian and reptile experts at Carnegie Museum of Natural History. Register online for the Zoom connection that plays while watching the 1993 flick on the platform of your choice. Hit play at 7 p.m. Aug. 1, then settle back and learn to separate fact from fiction. Registration is $10.

10. Swing a racket (in person)

Tennis lessons begin Aug. 3 in Allegheny County Parks for swingers from age 5 to adult. Register for the age group and park that fits best and head to the court. Learn the proper grip, footwork, rules of the game and how to score. Classes take place at North Park and Settler’s Cabin Park tennis courts through Aug. 25. Register here for the popular classes.

Sally Quinn

Sally Quinn is an award-winning writer and editor who has been covering her favorite city for more than 30 years. She appreciates all that Pittsburgh offers families and has a blast guiding her 10 grandkids to new discoveries. Sally welcomes your comments and story ideas for Kidsburgh.

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